[Ansteorra] Denton group recreates Middle Ages

Steve Scott (Dietrich) dietrich.strobelbart at yahoo.com
Fri Apr 29 12:12:54 PDT 2011


I know that many SCA folks have 'furkids'. Below is a list that may include items your dog finds attractive to chew.

Gabriele
mka Michelle Dodd

The pursuit of truth and beauty is a sphere of activity in which we are allowed to remain children all our lives. (Albert Einstein)




From: drjon at petplace.com
To: lygabrielerdb at hotmail.com
Subject: Learn About Toxicity of Common Items Dogs Eat
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 06:48:55 -0600







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Dog Crazy Newsletter

Monday April 25, 2011     

















Learn about Toxicity of Common Items Dogs Eat
















Dear Michelle DoddYes, we love our dogs ... but boy can they find creative ways to get into trouble!

When I visit the emergency clinic, a large percentage of the calls we get are about things that the dog has gotten into, and the owner wants to know whether or not to worry. 

Chewing on things is a normal part of "puppyhood", and many times the things our dogs eat are not dangerous. Still, you can expect to see some vomiting and maybe even a little diarrhea when your dog eats something that is not "food".

So, before you rush your pooch to the vet, check out this list of non-toxic items that dogs often eat. If your dog chews or eats small amounts of any of the items on this list, you do NOT have to worry unless the object becomes lodged in the stomach or intestines, causing an obstruction. 

Acrylic paint
Ballpoint pens
Bath oil
Birth control pills
Bubble bath soaps
Candles
Chalk
Citronella candles
Cosmetics
Crayons
Deodorants
Elmer's glue
Fabric softeners
Glow jewelry
Hair conditioner
Hand lotion
Incense
Indelible markers
Ink
Lipstick
Magic markers
Mineral oil
Modeling clay
Newspaper - non-colored 
Pencils (no longer made of lead)
Petroleum jelly
Play-Doh
Putty
Rubber cement
Shampoo
Shaving cream
Silica gel packets
Soap
Spackle
Suntan lotion
Superglue
Teething rings
Thermometers
Toothpaste
Water colors

If you have any doubt, always call your vet or local emergency clinic. 

By the way, the average cost for treating a dog that has gotten into a toxin is $342.65. If this would be a difficult expense for you to handle, you really should consider pet insurance. Insurance often pays 90% of the expenses.

Most toxins that are ingested are treatable, and given time and treatment many pets do just fine. Pet insurance offers pet owners the ability to do the best for their pet without worrying so much about the costs. For more information on pet insurance, go to:  petinsurance.com.

Until next time, 

Dr. Jon 

P.S.  Email this list of nontoxic items to all your friends who own dogs. They may also want to print it and keep it handy in case of an emergency.  Also, I'll send you a list of toxic items that dogs often eat, so you will know what to do if your dog eats them. 

P.P.S.  By clicking on the link below, you can get a free quote for pet insurance. It is worth your time to get a quote, especially if you don't have a big budget for unexpected pet expenses. Go to: www.petinsurance.com.
















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TODAY'S PET TIP

Avoiding Household Cleaner Toxicity



The ASPCA® announced that they managed more than 116,000 calls to its Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) hotline in 2006, several of which pertained to common household items.

Approximately 7,200 calls pertaining to cleaning agents such as bleaches, detergents and disinfectants were received-up 38 percent from the year before. Says Dr. Hansen, "Depending on the circumstances of exposure, some household cleaners can lead to gastrointestinal irritation or even severe oral burns for pets." Additionally, irritation to the respiratory tract may be possible if a product is inhaled.

"All household cleaners and other chemicals should be stored in a secure location well out of the reach of pets," recommends Dr. Hansen, "and when cleaning your pet's food and water bowls, crate or other habitat, a mild soap such as a hand dishwashing detergent along with hot water is a good choice over products containing potentially harsh chemicals." 






Dog Bloat, Dog vomiting, Dog gastric dilatation and volvulus, GDV, Pet Insurance 

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