[Bonwicke] Stoke Testing and Heart Attack Prevention

Jesus Cavazos toshirokoi at hotmail.com
Sat Jan 15 07:34:12 PST 2005



>From: "Kathryn Childress" <safiye1 at hotmail.com>
>Reply-To: Crane at wheelers.net
>To: crane at wheelers.net
>Subject: [Crane] Stoke Testing and Heart Attack Prevention
>Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 14:20:34 -0600
>
>Hi all.  I've had this for a while but I recently had reason to drag it our 
>for practical application at work.  So with that scary situation behind me, 
>I thought I'd share with everyone.
>
>Hope you never have to use either test.
>Kathy/Safiye
>
>
>----Original Message Follows----
>Is it a stroke? Is it a heart attack?
>
>
>This might be a lifesaver if we can remember to ask the three questions
>listed below! Sometimes symptoms of a stroke are difficult to identify.
>Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster for the stroke victim.
>A stroke victim may suffer brain damage when people nearby fail to
>recognize the symptoms of a stroke. Now doctors say any bystander can
>recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions:
>
>
>* Ask the individual to smile.
>
>
>* Ask him or her to raise both arms.
>
>
>* Ask the person to speak a simple sentence.
>
>
>If he or she has trouble with any of these tasks, call  9-1-1 immediately
>and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.
>
>
>After discovering that a group of non-medical volunteers could identify
>facial weakness, arm weakness and speech problems, researchers urged the
>general public to learn the three questions. They presented their
>conclusions at the American Stroke Association's annual meeting last
>February. Widespread use of this test could result in prompt diagnosis and
>treatment of the stroke and prevent brain damage.
>
>
>Is it a Heart Attack ?
>
>
>A cardiologist says if everyone who gets this e-mail sends it to 10 people,
>you can bet that at least one life will be saved.
>
>
>Read this... It could save your life!
>
>
>Let's say it's 6.15 P.M and you're driving home(alone of course), after an
>unusually hard day on the job. You're really tired, upset, and frustrated.
>Suddenly you start experiencing severe pain in your chest that starts to
>radiate out into your arm and up into your jaw. You   are only about five
>miles from the hospital nearest your home. Unfortunately you don't know if
>you'll be able to make it that far. You have  been trained in CPR, but the
>guy that taught the  course did not tell you how to perform it on yourself.
>
>
>HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK WHEN ALONE
>
>
>Since many people are alone when they suffer a heart attack, without help,
>the person whose heart is beating improperly and who begins to feel faint,
>has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousness. However, these
>victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously. A
>deep breath should be taken before each cough, and the cough must be deep
>and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest. ? A
>breath and a cough must be repeated about every two seconds without let-up
>until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to  be beating normally
>again. Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements
>squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating. The squeezing pressure on
>the  heart also helps it regain normal rhythm. In this way, heart attack
>victims can get to a hospital.
>
>





More information about the Bonwicke mailing list