HNW - HNW- Hardanger and Ukrainian Whitework

Linn Skinner skinner02 at sprynet.com
Mon Oct 6 18:13:01 PDT 1997


Netdarning or Lacis is a very old technique also known as filet, opus
araneum, opus filatorium, spiderwork and guipure d'art.  The earliest
recorded English piece is one belonging to St. Pau'ls Cathedral (1295).  I
really have a belief (undocumented) that Kloster block techniques with
fillings were techniques employed by much of continental western and
eastern Europe at an early date.

Linn

- ----------
> From: Dick Eney <dickeney at access.digex.net>
> To: H-Needlework at Ansteorra.ORG
> Subject: Re: HNW - HNW- Hardanger and Ukrainian Whitework 
> Date: Monday, October 06, 1997 4:47 PM
> 
> 
> On Mon, 6 Oct 1997 EowynA at aol.com wrote:
> 
> > I'm currently taking a Group Correspondence Course through EGA on
Ukrainian
> > Whitework.  I notice a design element that I would call Hardanger
(kloster
> > blocks around an open square, which may or may not be filled in).   I
> > understand that Hardanger apparently does not date back to our period
> > (pre-1600), but did not realize that there were other styles that look
> > similar and might date back that far.  Does anyone know of any other
> > national embroidery styles similar to Hardanger? 
> > 
> > Does anyone have any  references on early (ca. 1600) versions of this
> > style in any ethnicity?
> > 
> > Melinda Sherbring       Baroness Eowyn Amberdrake
> 
> I'm not sure this is similar but here goes...  I just received a copy of
a
> copy of a page from _Traditional Icelandic Embroidery_ (1985) by Elsa E. 
> Gudjonsson, who worked in the National Museum of Iceland for something
> like 35 years.  (The page is from a copy in Icelandic but it seems there
> is an English-language version). It shows an embroidery on network.  It's
> hard to tell whether the drawing is accurate or just sloppy, but if it is
> accurate, the network seems to be made by drawn work, as some of the
> threads seem to be woven as well as sewn together.  The solid squares are
> needle-woven over the network threads. The design is of stylized flowers
> at the corners with a pair of birds in the center, with interlaced
> dividing lines (like a diapered brocade).  The date "1650" is in the
> caption. 
> 
> The odd thing is that this technique is called "sprang" in Iceland, and
> Gudjonsson says there is no evidence of "the technique now known as
sprang
> abroad" in older times in Iceland.
> 
> We know embroidery on network was done in the 16t century, and I'd guess
> also in the 15th.  I base that guess on two 15th century illuminations of
> Mary weaving a long narrow piece of network on a free-standing loom that
> raises the working level to her waist while she sits next to it.  The
> fabric is definitely a network, and the warp is stretched over pegs
> between two tightener wheels; the whole assembly looks very much like an
> inkle loom. 
> 
> =Tamar (sharing computer dickeney at access.digex.net)
> 
>
============================================================================

> 
> To be removed from the Historic Needlework mailing list, please send a
> message to Majordomo at Ansteorra.ORG with the message body of "unsubscribe
> h-needlework".
============================================================================

To be removed from the Historic Needlework mailing list, please send a
message to Majordomo at Ansteorra.ORG with the message body of "unsubscribe
h-needlework".


More information about the H-needlework mailing list