HNW - HNW- Hardanger and Ukrainian Whitework

Linn Skinner skinner02 at sprynet.com
Tue Oct 7 15:39:27 PDT 1997


Hello Kathryn, nice to see you here.  I can send you to a rather good
article by Nancy Nehring, a lady who knows her needlelace in Piecework,
November/December 1995

She puts the birth of Hardangersom at about 1650.  She defines classic
Hardanger as consisting of only 6 stitches: Kloster block, woven bar, lace
and twisted-cross fillings, fagot and eyelet.  She dates the later varient
fillings as beginning in about 1900.

Linn

- ----------
> From: Mike Newell <72123.411 at compuserve.com>
> To: INTERNET:H-Needlework at Ansteorra.ORG
> Subject: Re:  Re: HNW - HNW- Hardanger and Ukrainian Whitework
> Date: Tuesday, October 07, 1997 12:24 PM
> 
> Dear Eowyn-
> 
> I don't  know if this parallels what you want to know but I'll try.
> 
> I've been curious for years about whether Hardanger work is period for
SCA.
> I have tried looking at what few modern books were done on Scandinavian
> needlework and have been frustrated. Most such books start at the 18th
> century. I did finally find one author who actually put a date on it -- 
> Mary Gostelow makes the claim that Hardanger work was developed
(invented?)
> in a particular region in Norway in the late 18th century. Most of the
> other books used  catch phrases like "ancient work" or "far in the past"
> and other such.  When I did find books that showed photos of hardanger
work
> from the 19th century it was clear that the pieces were worked more
simply
> than today's designs. I admit I was seeing black and white photos but
they
> all showed a simpler, toned down version of design. All monochrome, by
the
> way (some modern hardanger uses a range of colors).
> 
> I've heard some SCA folk justify hardanger as cutwork, so it's period.
> Wellll-- not quite. Cutwork is an old technique, heaven knows, but if
it's
> deliberately done on hardanger fabric, with pattern and technique
developed
> in late 18th century Norway, then it really isn't period. I don't know if
> the geometric kloster block technique was used on period cutwork.
> 
> Can anyone tell me why books on Scandinavian needlework repeatedly fail
to
> show early extant needlework? I teach needlework and garb to people, and
> act as a resource. If I could have a dime for every lady who wishes to
know
> what kind of needlework would be appropriate to her Norse persona......
> (tablet weaving doesn't seem to interest any of them). I desperately wish
I
> could point them to more available books.Short of having them travel to
> Scandinavia, and pick up every native booklet they can, what can we all
do?
> 
> I have seen that lovely book Small Churl is carrying. It is a really nice
> find, although pricey.
> 
> --Kathryn
> SCA: Kathryn Goodwyn
> "too many centuries, ...too little time"
>
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