HNW - lacis

Linn Skinner skinner02 at sprynet.com
Wed Oct 8 07:10:10 PDT 1997


Hi Donna:

Well it has been my understanding although Lacis is nowadays darned on
machine made or shuttle made ground, it was also made on needle knotted
ground in the historic past.  I'll pose that question to the curator I work
with at the V&A and see if she can point me to some references.  Embroidery
is my main expertise so I'm a little out of my league here.  My main
connection with Lacis is to trace the designs from sources, one of my
hobbies.

Linn

- ----------
> From: Donna Hrynkiw <donna at Kwantlen.BC.CA>
> To: H-Needlework at Ansteorra.ORG
> Subject: Re: HNW - lacis
> Date: Tuesday, October 07, 1997 7:07 PM
> 
> Hello from Donna Hrynkiw,
> 
> On Tue, 7 Oct 1997, Linn Skinner wrote:
> > Lacis is a type of darned net.  The net is made on a small frame about
6-8"
> 
> Must'a been a typo there. I think you meant the -darning- is done on a
> small frame.
> 
> The net ground itself isn't made on a frame, but tethered to a stationary
> point and worked with a shuttle and often a gauge.
> 
> The 'net' we're talking about is very much like the net used by fishermen
> and bird-catchers for centuries, only it was made of finer thread and
with
> smaller holes. (Although I've never been able to find specific
> documentation on the size of the meshes/holes, I'd guestimate they were
in
> the 5-8mm/side range.) When I make net intended for lacis, I work it
using
> a 2mm double-pointed knitting needle as a gauge.
> 
> > square and then thread is woven in and around the net with a needle to
make
> > a design.
> 
> The technique is often referred to as 'net darning', which may help you
> visualize it a little.
> 
> > Many of the designs in the early Italian and German patternbooks
> > were for Lacis.
> 
> Well, they were ideally suited for lacis, but there were/are several
> needlework techniques the graphed designs could be applied to. There
> are, however, a number of worked lacis pieces that can be matched with
> particular graphed patterns, so we -know- they were at least applied to
> lacis.
> 
> > The squares are then removed and often set in linen
> > pieces.
> 
> I don't quite understand what you mean by 'removed'. Squares of lacis
were
> often alternated with squares of embroidered linen to make bedclothes or
> tableclothes.
> 
> > The Victoria and Albert Museum in London has several textiles that
include
> > lacis squares which can be identified in the early modelbuchen.
> > 
> > Linn
> 
> Whups. I should have read ahead.
> 
> Best,
> 
> Donna
> SCA: Elizabeth Braidwood
> donna at kwantlen.bc.ca
> http://www.kwantlen.bc.ca/~donna
> 
>
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