HNW - Re: Beading

Linn Skinner skinner02 at sprynet.com
Fri Oct 10 19:01:16 PDT 1997


The other place to look for embroidery instructions in attaching gold to
fabric is Exodus...

Linn

- ----------
> From: Conny Fitzsimmons <lifitz at wco.com>
> To: Ansteorra Needleworks <H-Needlework at Ansteorra.ORG>
> Subject: HNW - Re: Beading
> Date: Friday, October 10, 1997 12:33 PM
> 
> Greetings from Catherine Lorraine,
> 
> The Kay Staniland book  Medieval Embroiderers has a good picture of the
> Mantel.  It was made in the Royal workshops in Sicily possibly for King
> Roger (1130-54) and later became part of the coronation insignia of the
> german kings and emperors.  The photo is in color, and there is a closeup
in
> black and white that clearly shows the seed pearls.   The gold work is
> packed rows of fine couched gold thread not beads.
> 
> There is a picture of cuffs in the same book with a great closeup that
shows
> seed pearls and the gold tube beads.  We would now call them heshi or
liquid
> gold.
> 
> I have made both the cuffs and a blue velvet gates with a red rampant
lion
> outlined in pears   and secured with both several hundred 2mm gold beads
and
> several hundred  green beads.
> 
> In her chapter on the Enrichment of Embroidery  "  Elaborate medieval
> embroideries were often further enriched by the addition of pearls and
other
> precious and semi-precious stones, gold or silver ornaments, enamelled
> plaques, or very occasionally at this perios, glass beads or discs".
> 
> Hope this helps.
> 
> Catherine Lorraine 
> Greetings from Donna,
> 
> On Thu, 9 Oct 1997, janis wrote:
> > Greetings All:  Thank you to all who replied regarding the questions
> > I had about beaded fringes and beadwork on fabrics. It was much
> > appreciated.  Unfortunately, it appears that not many people are
> > involved or interested in fabric beadwork or the history.
> 
> I've been keeping an look-out for bead-decorated clothing during the
> earlier Medieval period for quite a while now (10+ years) and have
uncovered
> only a very small handful of examples.
> 
> >From that I deduce that bead-decoration on clothing was not a common
> practice during that time (that, or my bibliographic wanderings havn't
> taken me to the right places). It seems that beads were far more often
> used in necklaces, earrings, or as talismens.
> 
> The instances I -did- find usually involved small pearls or amber. That
> large red coronation mantle of (I'm drawing a blank on the name -- Roger
> II?) that shows a tiger attacking a camel, and palm trees -- if you
> can find a close-up of the pattern, you'll discover that the white edging
> around all the lines is actually seed pearls, and the gold colour is
> either gold tube beads or some sort of gold bullion/cord. (Wasn't clear
> from the photo.)
> 
> There's a belt from a Spainish tomb (14th or 15th C, I believe) which is
> decorated with small heater (shield) shapes with heraldic devices worked
> in glass seed-beads.
> 
> There are, of course, all those Elizabethan gowns embellished with
pearls.
> 
> There are also some examples of Eastern European seed-beading on
parchment
> -- images of saints and such. But that's not clothing.
> 
> > Any early Celtic/Norse beadwork on clothing research,
> > and then Byzantine beadwork and beaded fringing or 700 to 1500 AD
> > Russian beadwork or beaded fringing would be greatly appreciated.
> > I am working on the beadwork and fringing anyway but it would be so
> > lovely to be able
> > to research and document what I am doing.  Thank you so much.
> >                                       Sine     (jesa at direct.ca)
> 
> Perhaps rather than following the classic SCA method of research (doing
and
> then attempting to document), you might find it more fruitful to research
> and then do.
> 
> (Sine -- Sine of Ramsgaard? Is that you?)
> 
> Donna Hrynkiw
> SCA: Elizabeth Braidwood
> donna at kwantlen.bc.ca
> http://www.kwantlen.bc.ca/~donna
> Currently reading: I, Claudius by Robert Graves
> 
>
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> 
>
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