HNW - Messy wrongsides

Jacquie Samples jacquie-samples at uiowa.edu
Tue Apr 7 07:10:58 PDT 1998


At 05:21 PM 4/6/98 -0700, Linn Skinner wrote:
Linn,
A friend of mine and I were talking about this yesterday and came with an
interesting theory and I was interested in your opinion.  We thought it
might come down to finances and deadlines.  People who were embroidering at
home probably had less money and resources, so they had to be neat to
conserve their precious silks and linens, etc.  Professional embroiderers,
although I'm sure they also were interested in getting the most from their
materials, were working more from deadline perspective, so that as the
deadline neared, the neatness on the back became less of a concern.  The
few pieces (and/or photos thereof) that I've seen that were worked in a
shop, seem to be fairly neat toward the top and middle, but rather messy
toward the bottom.  The pieces I've looked at weren't samplers, but pieces
of garments, I think. I don't have the book with me. The one I'm
specifically thinking of could have been made to decorate a wall or cushion
or something like that.

Any comments?

Jacquie


>Jacquie:
>
>I've looked at a fair number of "backsides" in museums and they fall into
>two categories (1) articles done in workshops under economic pressures of
>time are seldom neat.  If you don't trip on the loops you are lucky  (2)
>articles stitched at home are far neater and in the 17th century when band
>samplers became the vogue, the double-running designs that were seldom
>(unless at cuff or collar) done reversible when used on costume, were
>beginning to be nearly always reversible when stitched on samplers.  With a
>caveat however.  The 17th century samplers have a good many more "double" or
>compensating stitches than we would consider appropriate today in order to
>achieve reversibility.
>
>Linn
>
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