HNW - pencil marks

Betty Pillsbury flyingneedle at webtv.net
Thu Sep 24 23:10:13 PDT 1998


- --WebTV-Mail-1720279065-3484
Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit

I just attended a 2-day workshop in textile conservation given by
Deborah Bede at the Quilt Restoration Conference.  Never, never use soap
on a textile.  It forms an insoluble precipitate or curd (soap scum).
Use Orvus.  This can be found at a good quilt shop.  It has no
additives, bleaches, nor perfumes.  Always rinse very well.  Hope it
helps.

Betty P.
mailto:flyingneedle at webtv.net
http://www.vintagevogue.com/html/betty_pillsbury.html
http://www.queststudios.com/heritage/profil04.html


- --WebTV-Mail-1720279065-3484
Content-Disposition: Inline
Content-Type: Message/RFC822

Received: from mailsorter-102.bryant.webtv.net (mailsorter-102.iap.bryant.webtv.net
	[207.79.35.92]) by postoffice-152.iap.bryant.webtv.net (8.8.5/po.gso.24Feb98)
	with ESMTP id WAA02651; Thu, 24 Sep 1998 22:06:22 -0700 (PDT)
Received: from bastion.globeset.com (bastion.globeset.com [207.239.133.66])
	by mailsorter-102.bryant.webtv.net (8.8.8/ms.graham.14Aug97) with
	ESMTP id WAA03675; Thu, 24 Sep 1998 22:06:20 -0700 (PDT)
Received: (from majordom at localhost) by bastion.globeset.com (8.9.1a/8.9.1)
	id AAA05175 for h-needlework-digest-outgoing; Fri, 25 Sep 1998
	00:00:13 -0500 (CDT)
Date: Fri, 25 Sep 1998 00:00:13 -0500 (CDT)
Message-Id: <199809250500.AAA05175 at bastion.globeset.com>
From: owner-h-needlework at Ansteorra.ORG (h-needlework)
To: h-needlework-digest at Ansteorra.ORG
Subject: h-needlework V1 #135
Reply-To: H-Needlework at Ansteorra.ORG
Sender: owner-h-needlework at Ansteorra.ORG
Errors-To: owner-h-needlework at Ansteorra.ORG
Precedence: bulk
MIME-Version: 1.0


h-needlework        Friday, September 25 1998        Volume 01 : Number 135




- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 08:27:17 EDT
From: Noramunro at aol.com
Subject: Re: HNW - Elizabethan Purse or Burse

In a message dated 9/23/98 8:05:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
dcobb at MAIL.MEYERNET.COM writes:

> Several months ago there was some discussion on a purse or burse purchased
>  by the British Museum that supposedly belonged to Elizabeth R or Elizabeth
I
>  and was embroidered with metal thread.  I think there was a similar one
also
>  at the V&A.  I'm doing an article on bags and pouches and would appreciate
>  it very much if someone could tell me if that item was specifically a
purse,
>  seal bag, or burse...since there is a defined difference between the 3
>  terms.  Thank you for your help.

The item in question is a seal purse, which was found in private possession at
the death of its owner, turned over to Sotheby's for auction, but the British
Museum purchased it before the auction actually occurred.  It is now part of
their seals display.  It *did* belong to Elizabeth I; it is embroidered with
her monogram and Sotheby's personnel managed to document its transmission from
Elizabeth to the ancestor of the previous owner.  One of the Donnas (Kenton?)
put a photograph of it and the V&A purse, which is similar, on her web page

Stephanie/Alianora
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 10:27:04 -0400
From: Mike Newell <72123.411 at compuserve.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Cleaning Needlework

Dear Eowyn-

<Unfortunately for me, I followed this advice while working on my Master
Craftsman project, and the judges are both picky and sharp-eyed.  >

I don't suppose it's worth it to point out to the judges that there are
extant historical pieces with drawn lines still there? (only suggested in
case you can't get the lead out, as it were).

- - --Kathryn
SCA: Kathryn Goodwyn
'too many centuries...too little time"
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 10:27:06 -0400
From: Mike Newell <72123.411 at compuserve.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Museum photography

Dear Donna (and others):

My own experience in museum photography --which I did back in 1980 through
1988-- was in some American museums, Museum of Costume, Bath, V&A, and
Museum of London.. My camera broke several years ago and I haven't 
bothered to get it fixed.

**Yellow color** : you need a  tungsten filter. I found this out the hard
way when I photographed a lovely 1986 )1987?) exhibition of 18th century
costume and silks at the Boston Musuem of  Fine Arts. I shot a roll of
film, it developed with a yellow cast, and the people at the photoshop sold
me a special filter. It worked. The dummies I photographed were *not*
behind glass. When I shot things behind glass I needed, instead, a
polarizing filter. Of course, this polarizing filter cut down on light. I
opened the F stop all the way and prayed. Most of the time I got OK shots.
I used AS1000 film with a SLR camera -- Pentax ME.

When I was shooting stuff at the V&A it was like shooting in a cave. The
light meter laughed at me, but I took a deep breath, shot, and they all
came out!

The  magnifying lens, at my camera shop, was called a telephoto lens. I
paid the $60.00 (or was it $100??) and found it was worth it.

The ASA1000 film was the fastest available at that time--  its main
drawback is graininess. I was told using a tripod might cut down on that, 
but since some museums don't want tripods, I used the method some other
Listers do --  bracing myself against the glass,or my leg, trying not to
breathe, etc. Most of the time it worked, but now and then I got a blurry
shot. By then I was back home in the US and it was too late. :-(

I hope this is helpful -- I'm not a techno person, but I learned just
enough to get the photos I wanted.

- - --Kathryn (science impaired)
SCA: Kathryn Goodwyn
"too many centuries...too little time"
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 10:44:56 EDT
From: Aceia at aol.com
Subject: Re:  Re: HNW - Cleaning Needlework

On this similar thread... My mother's wedding dress (1959) has a wine stain
down the front.  The satin has aged to an unmatchable ivory and the hand
stitched freshwater pearls and French lace have turned champagne.  The wine
was white wine, so when it was dry-cleaned they missed the stain... it has now
turned red.  The stain was aquired in 1984 when my sister wore it for her
wedding.    The handiwork on the dress is very beautiful and we would like to
'reclaim' this piece for use, but with the stain it is worthless (unless we
cut it up to make memory pillows or something).
Would the ivory soap and Biz work on something like this without leaving a
whiter mark where the stain was??
- - -Robin
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 10:47:52 EDT
From: Aceia at aol.com
Subject: Re:  Re: HNW - Cleaning Needlework

In a message dated 9/22/98 10:38:33 AM, you wrote:

>So never, ever use pencil to mark needlework.  There are several disappearing
ink

I too have had problems with pencil lead, and amazingly when I tell people
that they are shocked.  I have had people swear by pencil for marking
embroidery, but all it take is one time when it won't come out!  Some people
just can't believe it though.....

- - -Robin
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 10:49:05 EDT
From: EowynA at aol.com
Subject: Re:  Re: HNW - Cleaning Needlework

In a message dated 9/24/98 7:33:30 AM, you wrote:

<<I don't suppose it's worth it to point out to the judges that there are
extant historical pieces with drawn lines still there? (only suggested in
case you can't get the lead out, as it were).>>

Not of use, alas.  Historical precedent is not an excuse when they are judging
excellence of execution today.

I will be working some test pieces next week, and I'll try these various
methods and see what happens. 

Melinda/Eowyn
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 10:53:47 EDT
From: EowynA at aol.com
Subject: Re:  Re:  Re: HNW - Cleaning Needlework

In a message dated 9/24/98 7:49:29 AM, you wrote:

<<Would the ivory soap and Biz work on something like this without leaving a
whiter mark where the stain was??>>

I don't know.  The advice I was given about using soap and Biz was for
needlework, and the entire item needed to be soaked in it and gently agitated.
I bought a big tupperware-like container that would hold the needlework, and
that I could shake whenever I walked by.  With a silk wedding dress, this
method would probably involve a bathtub, since the whole dress would be
getting wet  (to avoid water stains).  That sounds awfully risky.   Good luck!

Melinda  / Eowyn
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 10:54:16 EDT
From: Aceia at aol.com
Subject: Re:  HNW - Edwardian beading

In a message dated 9/22/98 6:30:48 PM, you wrote:

>I had planned to 'cheat' and use that modern beading
>thread everyone recommends.  Will that be any better than the cotton still
>doing its job on the original?  


I don't know too much about historic beading, but I do know that Modern
beading thread is stronger and more durable when using 'sharp' beads like
bugle beads.  It does not cut as easily.  If all you are using is glass seed
beads that are rounded on the ends, cotton will work fine.  Modern beads are
machine produced and many (especially bugle beads) are literally broken into
the correct size which leaves very sharp edges.

- - -Robin
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 8:22:56 -0700
From: GARNER at ADMIN.HNC.EDU
Subject: HNW - Embroidery for Clergy Stole

This Christmas I want to make a clery stole for a priest friend of mine.
Denis is a bit of a history maven, and is terribly proud of his French
heritage. He even tries to force people to address him as "Pere Denis."

I'm looking for ideas as to what type of embroidery - or any other
needlework - would be apropos.  Thank you.

- - --Joan Garner
  garner at admin.hnc.edu
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 11:34:23 -0400
From: Donna Kenton <donna at dabbler.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Museum photography

Tungsten filter.  I'll look into that.

>The  magnifying lens, at my camera shop, was called a telephoto lens. I
>paid the $60.00 (or was it $100??) and found it was worth it.

I have one of those, too, but was told it was for distance shooting, not
close-ups.  For close-ups, I use the magnifying filters, and can put on
multiple filters to get really close shots.  I admit to not having tried
the telephoto lens with the close-ups.

The advantage of the filters is that you don't have to take off your old
lens and risk getting dust in there.  They just screw on.

>--Kathryn (science impaired)
>SCA: Kathryn Goodwyn

Thanks for the ideas!
Donna


__________________________________________________
Donna Kenton/Rosalind Bennett
donna at dabbler.com * http://www.dabbler.com
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:29:09 -0700
From: "Linn Skinner" <skinner02 at sprynet.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Embroidery for Clergy Stole

Joan:
>
>I'm looking for ideas as to what type of embroidery - or any other
>needlework - would be apropos.  Thank you.

Clerical stoles can be made in any sort of technique, but first a few
questions:  Is Pere Denis Roman Catholic, Anglican, Eastern Rite?  Would he
prefer a stole in colors appropriate to a particular liturgical season and
what are his local rules as to liturgical colors?  Many stoles can be
produced in goldwork, silkwork, blackwork, drawnthread, applique, patchwork,
canvaswork.  The type of needlework is not as important as making the stole
very personal to the priest who will use it in worship.

There are good books out on making up stoles, designing, symbolism, etc.,
but first do get some ideas from him.

Linn Skinner
Skinner Sisters
Currently working on a goldwork stole she hopes to have finished by this
Christmas for a friend.

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 08:57:21 -0800
From: Erica Dibietz <orcinus at alaska.net>
Subject: Re: HNW - magnifying lamps

JoAnne Borona wrote:
> 
> Erica,
> 
> I recently ordered a really nice one from Damark.  If fact, I got one for
> my Mom as well.  The magnifying glass is about six inches in diameter and
> surrounded by a fluorescent light.  (I know--the light can effect colors,
> but I'm more interested in being able to SEE those little needlepoint and
> cross stitches.  By the time I get around to stitching the colors have been
> chosen already.)  It was about forty dollars, and clamps onto a table-like
> a drafting light.  The only thing is that it really is heavy, so you need
> to secure it to something that's equally heavy.  I had planned on putting
> it on the 'cat condo' (you know, one of those carpet covered cat complexes,
> since it is in back of my chair and to the side, and I thought that it
> would be out of the way--but no dice.  Too heavy!  So you need to pick your
> spot for it.  And in the beginning, it didn't want to stay where you
> adjusted it to--but a piece of string fixed that, and now it is being more
> co-operative.  I no longer have the catalog, but will poke around my desk
> later today for the invoice.  You might just try calling Damark, and ask
> them to do a search for it.  I have done this with other companies.
> Hopefully, I'll find something with a number on it for you later.
> 
> JoAnne
Thank you JoAnne- I'll give them a call.
Erica
============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 12:28:40 -0500
From: Charlene Charette <charlene at flash.net>
Subject: Re: HNW - Embroidery for Clergy Stole

GARNER at ADMIN.HNC.EDU wrote:

> This Christmas I want to make a clery stole for a priest friend of mine.
> Denis is a bit of a history maven, and is terribly proud of his French
> heritage. He even tries to force people to address him as "Pere Denis."
>
> I'm looking for ideas as to what type of embroidery - or any other
> needlework - would be apropos.  Thank you.

I've seen a book on embroidering religious vestments at the Houston library.  I
believe it was on English embroidery, rather than French.  I take it you are
looking specifically for French designs, any time period?  Where are you
located?  I have some contacts in the Cajun French Catholic community that might
be able to help if I have a better idea exactly what you're looking for.  Email
me directly (charlene at flash.net).

- - --Charlene

- - --
The only difference between a rut and a grave are the dimensions. -- Patricia
Swerda


============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 13:50:34 -0400
From: "JoAnne Borona" <joanne1 at worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Re: HNW - magnifying lamps

I did later send all that information.  Didn't you get it?

JoAnne
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 13:51:44 -0500 (CDT)
From: Lynn Downward <downward at lanminds.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - magnifying lamps

>I did later send all that information.  Didn't you get it?
>
>JoAnne



If you have to send it again, would you be willing to share with the list?
Since the topic came up recently, I've been thinking how helpful a
magnifying lamp would be for much of the stuff I do.

Thanks,
LynnD


============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 12:07:57 -0700
From: Carolyn Kayta Barrows <kayta at slip.net>
Subject: Re:  HNW - Edwardian beading

>>I had planned to 'cheat' and use that modern beading
>>thread everyone recommends.  Will that be any better than the cotton still
>>doing its job on the original?  
>
>
>I don't know too much about historic beading, but I do know that Modern
>beading thread is stronger and more durable when using 'sharp' beads like
>bugle beads.  It does not cut as easily.  If all you are using is glass seed
>beads that are rounded on the ends, cotton will work fine.  Modern beads are
>machine produced and many (especially bugle beads) are literally broken into
>the correct size which leaves very sharp edges.

That's why I decided to cheat.  Some of the beads on my original are
sharp-ended and look like half-length bugle beads, which I was able to
match with modern-made beads.  I was thinking about the wearing of my copy,
and how much fun repairing beadwork is(not).  Since you mention it, my
original seems not to have been worn much.  Maybe this is why the cotton
thread still holds, and why there are so many beads still in place.  
  
The rest of the beads on my original are nailheads and seed beads. The
larger nailheads are the ones I have been carefully collecting, by the ones
and twos, for so long.  I usually find them in the bottoms of cardboard
boxes which antique stores have been using for dumping random stuff in.
One day I managed to score several hanks of little nailheads, and then I
knew it was 'money where your mouth is' time.



Kayta
     ////.\\\
    ////-00\\\
   ((((   7 (((
     |   -- ))))
     * )   (((((
  /----\   /---\

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 12:12:13 -0700
From: Carolyn Kayta Barrows <kayta at slip.net>
Subject: Re: HNW - Embroidery for Clergy Stole

>There are good books out on making up stoles, designing, symbolism, etc.,
>but first do get some ideas from him.
>

So why are they all published in England and not here?  Are there any
American books on this?  (Not that I am being xenophobic - I have several
of the English books and they're wonderful.)


Kayta
     ////.\\\
    ////-00\\\
   ((((   7 (((
     |   -- ))))
     * )   (((((
  /----\   /---\

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 15:13:14 -0400
From: "JoAnne Borona" <joanne1 at worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Re: HNW - magnifying lamps

Lynn, 

And anyone else who missed it the first time around.  Here is the blurb
from the damark catalog that I copied and sent out  a couple of days ago. 
I can't say enough what a big help this is to me.  I am sure that anyone
with bad eyes would love it.

JoAnne


Erica,

Great news!  I found the catalog.  

Damark   1 (800) 827-6767

"Magnifying Lamp
	This magnifying lamp eases eyestrain on sewing tasks, art projects,
electronic repairs and more.  The lamp clamps onto your table or desk and
has a 42" extension arm that gives you room to work.  The 3-diopter lens
magnifies your view while the included 22-watt circular fluorescent tube
floods the viewing area with light.  Includes convenience outlet in base
and 3-conductor cord.  
(White) Item No. B-20455-569943	(Black) Item No. B-20455-569929
S/H Code D each	($7.99)
$39.99


This was in a members' catalog, just tell them a friend told you about
it--especially if they start asking for codes off the back of the catalog.

It really has been nice working these last few weeks.  This is a 'God
Send'.  I'm sure you'll like it.  I have seen a few advertised else where. 
Halogens are TOO hot!  And others I've seen are MUCH more expensive.  I
think it was in Clotilde's that I saw one that sat on a table for almost
$200.00

Anyway, I've done all I can.  

JoAnne

Oh, same disclaimer as everyone else--I don't work for them, have just
ordered from them.  J.


============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 14:56:07 -0500 (CDT)
From: Lynn Downward <downward at lanminds.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - magnifying lamps

>Lynn,
>
>And anyone else who missed it the first time around.  Here is the blurb
>from the damark catalog that I copied and sent out  a couple of days ago.
>I can't say enough what a big help this is to me.  I am sure that anyone
>with bad eyes would love it.
>
>JoAnne
>
Dear JoAnne,

Thank you; I'll be calling them very soon.
LynnD


============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 23:03:30 -0400 (EDT)
From: Carol Thomas <scbooks at neca.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Museum photography

At 11:34 AM 9/24/98 -0400, you wrote:
>Tungsten filter.  I'll look into that.
>
>>The  magnifying lens, at my camera shop, was called a telephoto lens. I
>>paid the $60.00 (or was it $100??) and found it was worth it.

Could this have been a "macro" lens?  They are used in close-ups, and come
in plain and zoom versions.  

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 23:03:45 -0400 (EDT)
From: Carol Thomas <scbooks at neca.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Embroidery for Clergy Stole

At 12:12 PM 9/24/98 -0700, you wrote:
>
>>There are good books out on making up stoles, designing, symbolism, etc.,
>>but first do get some ideas from him.
Probably because much of the greatest ecclesiastical embroidery ever done
was English.  It was a serious export item in the middle ages, since their
skill was famous.

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 23:23:51 -0400
From: DC <uboru at pop.erols.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - tambour work

Guess I'm new to tambour work. How early back does it's usage go and was it
used in Europe, or just the middle east?

Thanks
Brigantia


============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 20:26:58 -0700 (MST)
From: ronna at primenet.com (Ronnie)
Subject: Re: HNW - recording color

>  This is a great idea.  I do want accurate color - that's why I was
>interested in the finding out about the 800 speed film.  

You may also want to see if your local photography shop has or can order,
1000 speed film.  I took photos of birthday candle-blowing in the dark, and
the prints were splendid, with no yellowing.  YMMV.  When working with this
speed, obviously, one must be very, very still, as a shutter is open quite a
while, so *any* movement makes a smear.  
Ronnie. 

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 18:28:02 -0400
From: Susan Evans <woofie at gte.net>
Subject: HNW - Embroidery for Clergy Stole

>>There are good books out on making up stoles, designing, symbolism, etc.,
>>but first do get some ideas from him.

  A great author for this type of work is Beryl Dean.  She has several
books out.

  You may also want to check out nearby Catholic seminary libraries.  They
will most likely have books on technique and examples.  I visited one near
Albany, NY and not only was it a wonderful place for research, the
librarian was kind enough to take me on a look-touch tour of the vestments
in storage - many old ones with different gold thread techniques.  

  There are also catalogs for vestments - some carry supplies for the
embroiderer - trim and threads.  Even appliques (including for the SCA
people - pelicans).

  Tinsel Trading in NYC on 38th St. is a good place for metal threads and
ecclesiastical trims.

Sue Evans

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 23:45:18 EDT
From: Jafath at aol.com
Subject: Re: HNW - Cleaning Needlework

In a message dated 98-09-22 21:05:25 EDT, you write:

<< <<Pardon an off-the-wall suggestion, but could the linen be painted in the
 offending places?>>
 
 Not for a judged piece, alas  >>

pssst: I did this for the MC-canvas, and got away with it! I used a roll-on
correction fluid. But don't tell anybody . . .

Jo Anne
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 17:25:37 -0700
From: Curtis & Mary <ladymari at cybertrails.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Cleaning Needlework

>
>
> The lemon juice - white vinegar sounds like it will harm the black silk on the
> linen.

Eowyn, I know of no reason an acidic mix like this would hurt the silk, though it
*could* weaken the linen.  Silk is a protien fiber and mild acids won't hurt it
[or wool], while linen, and other cellulose fibers *can* be damaged by acids.
Alkaline is just the reverse, damage to protien fibers, little or no damage to
cellulose, tho I use after dyeing dips of ammonia [very alkaline] to change colors
of natural dyes, without adverse affects on the fiber, it's just for a few
minutes, then rinsed out.

Hope you find a solution.
Mairi, Atenveldt



============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- ------------------------------

End of h-needlework V1 #135
***************************

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

- --WebTV-Mail-1720279065-3484--
============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.


More information about the H-needlework mailing list