HNW - RE: h-needlework V1 #375

Hope H. Dunlap hhdunlap at msn.com
Sun Jul 4 21:03:18 PDT 1999


http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/Wymarc/master1.htm
shows some medieval and renaissance embroideries.  This
shows some Viking embroidery techniques, with a great
bibliography:
http://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/vikembroid.html


- -----Original Message-----
From: owner-h-needlework at Ansteorra.ORG
[mailto:owner-h-needlework at Ansteorra.ORG]
Sent: Thursday, July 01, 1999 1:00 AM
To: h-needlework-digest at Ansteorra.ORG
Subject: h-needlework V1 #375



h-needlework          Thursday, July 1 1999          Volume
01 : Number 375




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- ----------

Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 10:24:15 +0200
From: "Holliday, Rachel {DISC~Welwyn}"
<RACHEL.HOLLIDAY at roche.com>
Subject: HNW - RE: Needlework in England/Ireland

The other place to try is the Embroiderers' Guild also at
Hampton Court they
have a comprehensive collection of textiles from all
periods.  It may be
only open to guild members if not you will probably have to
make an
appointment and tell them what you are interested in looking
at, as they
will have to get it from the archives for you.  This is only
really meant
for serious study until it moves to a new location.  If you
want I will
check on the details for you.  Some is available on my web
site, including I
think an email address as they don't have a web page yet.
http://www.homeusers.prestel.co.uk/witchwood/index.html

Rachel

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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 11:39:50 EDT
From: cynthia j ley <cley at juno.com>
Subject: HNW - seeking book recommendations

Greetings, all.

I was wondering if I could ask you for some help. I am
looking for book
titles which might be helpful on researching English
embroidered square
bags of the 14th-15th centuries. I am interested interested
in finding
out about paneled bags. I suspect I'll have to use a lot of
ILL. I have
found some things, but the photos have been generally poor
and the
information on technique lacking. Please do not send
websites as I don't
have access.

Thank for you for any help you might be able to offer.



				Arlys


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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 14:37:22 -0400
From: Mike Newell <72123.411 at compuserve.com>
Subject: HNW - Buratto, not Lacis (long)

Dear List:

I decided to browse through my copy of Margaret Abegg's "A
Propos
Patterns". She has some photos of extant pieces of darned
net, and I think
that what I am doing technically counts as buratto, not
lacis. The only
difference I can deduce is that buratto is darned on a
ready-made net,
while in lacis you make the net, first, then darn it.  What
I found
exciting was that the photos *seem* to indicate reprise
stitch, not cloth
stitch! Since I thought only cloth stitch was used in the
Renaissance,  I'd
appreciate any second opinions (I used a magnifying glass).

Fig.82, 85 "Embroidered Net or Buratto, Italian, XVI
century, formerly in a
private collection, NY.

Burratto (meaning in Italian, sieve, sifter) is: "Linen of
the kind called
Buratto (from the word bura, coarse linen) which is a stiff,
transparrent
material something like canvas, provides a convenient medium
for the quck
and easy attainment of drawn-thread effect. The texture is
treated like
drawn linen and on the already transparent ground the design
is worked in
darning or linen-stitch." Elisa Ricci, Italian  Lace,
Vol.1,London,
Philadelphia, 1913, p.41.

The figure 85 shows a pattern I recognize from a 16th
century lace pattern
book (Possibly L'Honest Essempio", by Mattio Pagan), showing
a Sphinx, man
playing a flute  (holding a club?) and a dog, with foliage.

Fig.63 of Abegg shows a burrato piece also dated as 17thc
entury, but
showing a very classic pattern of birds shown in earlier
Italian pattern
books.

I also looked at a recent book I acquired: "Guide to Lace
and Linens"  by
Elizabeth M. Kurella. (great book!) She lists Lacis under
Filet and it's
very difficult for me to find any difference between that
and her listing
for Buratto, except that Lacis is worked on a hand knotted
mesh. She lists
it as "darned net" as well, which it is.

I am * very* encouraged to find that I can continue to do
reprise stitch on
a pre-made foundation net and be authentic for SCA purposes!
This does not
mean I won't, eventually, try my hand at netting my own
background, or try
to figure out cloth stitch (and hopefully get it to be neat
and tidy).

- - --Kathryn
SCA: Kathryn Goodwyn
"too many centuries...too little time"
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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 15:09:07 -0400
From: Mike Newell <72123.411 at compuserve.com>
Subject: HNW - Buying Antique Lace

Dear JLynch (name?)

<Remember to store it rolled, with a non-acid padding (I use
neutral
buffered interleafing, which you can get from any good
bookbinding source).
 Or frame it (also acid free).>

Thanks for this tip! I don't collect antique textiles so any
advice is
helpful. Our "new" home (1889) has a nice dry attiic, where
I plan to store
costume and fabric if necessary.

To be honest, I thought to display  the lacis  on my
eventual
sideboard--the antique store has it on an antique sideboard
with dishes on
it, so I'll have to remove a lot of items to get the runner
out from
under.. From your reaction I gather I  shouldn't.. Oh, well.

<You can make a good photocopy with a contrasting colored
paper behind.
You can then use the photocopy to chart!>

Wow, thanks for this advice, too!

- - --Kathryn
SCA:  Kathryn Goodwyn
"too many centuries...too little time"

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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 12:50:41 -0700
From: jlynch at cob.org
Subject: Re: HNW - Buying Antique Lace

Well...

If it's real, knock-your-socks-off lace, by all means wear
cotton gloves and do
all the other things to make sure it's preserved.  If it's
just really cool,
display it!  For instance, I have a filet tablecloth
(probably 1920's) which I
use for formal dinners.

It's had red wine and cranberry sauce spilled on it, and I
don't cry - I just
handwash it and put it back in the linen drawer.  It's not a
great example of
any style and it's not that old.  If it were made in 1810,
though...  I wouldn't
keep it.  I don't have the facilities to store it properly,
and would probably
give it to our local museum.  They have a good textiles
conservationist (no, no
real lace, sorry!).

So, of _course_ display it!  The most you'll lose
financially is $15 and you'll
get much delight out of it.  (Sorry, I thought you were
buying it for
collection.)


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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 16:08:35 -0400
From: Donna Kenton <kenton at neaccess.net>
Subject: Re: HNW - Buying Antique Lace

>To be honest, I thought to display  the lacis  on my
eventual
>sideboard--the antique store has it on an antique sideboard
with dishes on
>it, so I'll have to remove a lot of items to get the runner
out from
>under.. From your reaction I gather I  shouldn't.. Oh,
well.

[crawling up onto the soapbox]

Yes, storing the piece of lace rolled with acid free paper
is the best way
of preserving it if you intend to use the piece as an
investment.

However, you need to decide if you want the piece as an
investment or as a
decoration for your home.

If you love the piece and want to see it, for heaven's sake,
please DO!  If
it's too fragile that you only want the pattern, that's
okay, too.

I have several different things I've gotten at antique
shops, table linens
among them, and I use them all the time.  They weren't
expensive and I
enjoy using them.  So I do.

[climbing off the soapbox and hoping I didn't offend]

Donna


____________________________________________________________
_
Donna Kenton * donna at dabbler.com * http://www.dabbler.com
Baroness Rosalind Bennett * EK Chronicler
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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 17:03:49 -0400
From: Mike Newell <72123.411 at compuserve.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Buying Antique Lace

Dear Donna:

<However, you need to decide if you want the piece as an
investment or as a
decoration for your home.>

I want it as a study piece *and* as a decoration for my
home. I collect
Blue Willow China, not linens. I am feeling thankful that
others seem to
think that household linens were made to be used, too.

When I used to visit England my friends there stunned me
when they said
they used bleach to clean their embroidered tablecloths. :-O
Then I took
their advice. If you dilute the bleach and hover over the
stain like a
mothering angel, it does just fine. I use my embroidered
tablecloths for
serving people tea and of course, there are tea stains.

I think the saddest thing is to see all those lovely
handworked linens of
various types at antique shops, flea markets, etc. . To see
the hand
embroidered linens from the 1920's, '30's amd '50's
gathering dust is so
pitiful -- they are like lonely orphans. Some of them have
hand worked
crochet lace or tatted lace, and I've seen very finely
worked drawn thread
work on high count handkerchief weight linen. . Poor little
things!

My mother puts a nasty clear plastic cover over the
tablecloth she and I
embroidered in the 1960's. :-(

- - --Kathryn
SCA:  Kathryn Goodwyn
"too many centuries...too little time"
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- ------------------------------

Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 18:27:37 -0400 (EDT)
From: craftyjlady at webtv.net (judy dunlap)
Subject: [none]

unsubscribe

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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 19:08:58 -0400
From: Margaret Bolger <Margaret_Bolger at compuserve.com>
Subject: HNW - Buttons for beading etc

This lady's father used to produce hand-made glass buttons
in London for
all the big couture houses in the 40s/50s/60s.
She is now selling off his large stock of buttons.  She
shows some which
are suitable for embroidery and beading.

You can get more details and view some of the buttons on her
web site

http://website.lineone.net/~nicbutns/

Hope this was of interest to you!

Margaret
antique costume & textiles
http://www.artizania.co.uk
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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 17:48:15 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Kristen M. Sieber" <lady_gawain at yahoo.com>
Subject: HNW - N'work in Ireland/England

To those who have asked--I will be staying in
Glastonbury for 10 days and a whirlwind 4 days in
London.  I'll have a car in Glastonbury but not
London.  I'll be "all over" southern Ireland. (Also, 3
days in Rome).
Also, I don't expect any private appointments--this
isn't "serious" study; I want to get some
medieval/renaissance documentation for canvas
work/needlepoint.  Thanks for the info so far!

Kristen Morgaine Sieber
lady_gawain at yahoo.com

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Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 20:28:36 -0700
From: Curtis & Mary <ladymari at cybertrails.com>
Subject: Re: HNW - Buying Antique Lace

> I have several different things I've gotten at antique
shops, table linens
> among them, and I use them all the time.  They weren't
expensive and I
> enjoy using them.  So I do.

This reminds me of a couple of things, one said to me by who
knows what person
at what time in my life:  Why save it up for a special
occasion?  I might not
live that long  and one from my grandmother, actually a
commment from her about
recieving flowers " I'd much rather have them now than at my
funeral"

Mary, Arizona
Mairi, Atenveldt

and whichever you call is too d*m hot!

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End of h-needlework V1 #375
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