HNW - Blackwork thread counts

Frank&Tracy Thallas JR hardcorps at vcn.com
Tue May 4 14:29:47 PDT 1999


In general you wouldn't want the stuff specifically made for embroidery
for the body of a garment anyway - too stiff and scratchy! (and as youi
mentioned, WAY to expensive for a 4-yard shirt!!!)
  If you do use the embroidery stuff for collar and cuffs, try and match
the appearance/thread count to your garment fabric as closely as possible,
and line the pieces with your garment fabric for greater comfort.
  Also launder a bit of this beforehand - many of the embroidery fabrics
will shrink or distort, so you have to decide if the convenience is worth
never being able to wash this shirt.....

  Liadain
- ----------
> Thank you.  If I want to make a shirt with blackwork cuffs and collars,
> would the best period-correct approximation be to buy good-quality
> sewing linen and work the blackwork freehand over it, concentrating on
> keeping the motifs even in size rather than on the number of threads
> under each stitch?  (This would be a relief, actually; the thought of
> buying embroiderer's high-count linen in shirt yardages made me pale.)
>
> Betsy Perry
>
> ---
> Elizabeth Hanes Perry
> Rogue Wave Software
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Linn Skinner [mailto:skinner02 at sprynet.com]
> > Sent: Tuesday, May 04, 1999 1:14 PM
> > To: H-Needlework at Ansteorra.ORG
> > Subject: Re: HNW - Blackwork thread counts
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > >If surviving Elizabethan blackwork embroideries were on 40-60 count
> > >linen, were they generally worked over four?  (Over *gulp* one?)
> > >
> > Actually, they were seldom (if ever) stitched in a counted
> > thread technique
> > on costume pieces.  They are mostly neatly stitched over
> > approximately 2-3
> > threads.   I have not to date seen any costume pieces I can
> > with certainty
> > say were stitched in a counted thread technique.  When the
> > filling designs
> > began to appear on samplers (17th Century), then they were counted and
> > sometimes worked over 3 threads.
> >
> > The other issue is the relative weight of the spun linen used
> > for weaving
> > these fabrics.  We don't weave with such fine threads today
> > so even our high
> > count evenweave fabrics for embroidery (currently 45ct is
> > available 50 is no
> > longer produced) are really not "authentic" as the relative
> > values of thread
> > guage/space between thread is not reproduced.  Also the quality of our
> > linens is much inferior as to slubs and uneven spinning.  You
> > need also to
> > remember that linen used for shirts, etc. was quite different
> > weight than
> > that used for coifs and the sleeves which carried heavy
> > embroidery with
> > stitchery encrusted with metallic purls and twists.
> >
> > Linn Skinner
> > Skinner Sisters
> > skinner_sisters at compuserve.com
> >
> > ==============================================================
> > ==============
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> >
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