HNW - Re: h-needlework V1 #336

jennifer guyton caitlynmew at fast.net
Wed May 12 04:56:41 PDT 1999


Hello Everyone..
I am new to this list. I have a question. My best friend bought silk at Pennsic last year and is spinning it to that it can be used as embroidery floss. How would one go about dyeing it? It is still wrapped on the spools right now. I understand it will have to be wrapped onto cards..but past that, Im not sure.
Id appreciate any help.
Also..if anyone knows where I can get some good blackwork patterns for coifs and such, I would appreciate it. Someplace in expensive as funds are tight.
Thanks
Lady Caitlyn MacKenzie

h-needlework wrote:

> h-needlework          Wednesday, May 12 1999          Volume 01 : Number 336
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 15:37:38 +1000
> From: "MCCONNELL, Megan" <Megan.McCONNELL at suncorpmetway.com.au>
> Subject: HNW - Saxon embroidery/costume
>
> I don't know if it was me or not, but would love the website url!  Could you
> do a general list post re this.
>
> Megan McConnell
> Collections Officer
> SUNCORP-METWAY Ltd
> GPO Box 288, Brisbane  Q  4001
> ph (07) 3362 1361   Fax (07) 3362 2422
> E-Mail:  megan.mcconnell at suncorpmetway.com.au
>
> - ------------------------------------------------------------
>
> The contents of this message are the views of the Author and
> do not necessarily reflect the views of SUNCORP-METWAY LTD.
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 02:59:42 EDT
> From: Mbroidress at aol.com
> Subject: Re: HNW - re:"Saxon" embroidery/costume
>
> In a message dated 5/10/99 12:19:42 PM Pacific Daylight Time, jlynch at cob.org
> writes:
>
> << I was conversing with a nice lady on these lists last week.  She
>  originally signed on discussing Saxon clothing/embelishment.
>
>  I've lost your @dress!  Please email me back.  I still owe you my
>  Anglo-Saxon embroidery webpage and email list.
>
>  Sorry for the space,
>  Meresigha Stonegatta of Witham
>   >>
>
>
> Oh goodness!.. Don't be sorry for the space... :-)  I would love to see that
> web page too..
>
> Sincerely,
> Trinite
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 08:32:55 -0500
> From: Lauretta Wenger <Lwenger at WAUKESHA.TEC.WI.US>
> Subject: Re: HNW - re:"Saxon" embroidery/costume
>
> I am so sorry for taking up this space.  I have tried to e-mail Meresigha, but something is amiss here at work.  I can only respond to mail.  If you e-mail me privately I'll be able to send the very long letter I wrote.
>
> Lewina
>
> >>> "Jackie Lynch" <jlynch at cob.org> 05/10 2:17 PM >>>
> I was conversing with a nice lady on these lists last week.  She
> originally signed on discussing Saxon clothing/embelishment.
>
> I've lost your @dress!  Please email me back.  I still owe you my
> Anglo-Saxon embroidery webpage and email list.
>
> Sorry for the space,
> Meresigha Stonegatta of Witham
>
> Associate Planner, City of Bellingham
> 210 Lottie Street, Bellingham, WA   98225
> (360) 676-6982
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                !
> !
> !
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 09:43:38 EDT
> From: CONNECT at aol.com
> Subject: Re: HNW - Hardanger Embroidery
>
> In a message dated 5/10/99 11:35:03 PM, ladymari at cybertrails.com writes:
>
> << In fact once when the embroidered champions favor was done in cotton floss
> on
> Aida I wrote in my documentation that I purposely used cotton because I knew
> it
> would stand up to a rough and tumble life on the tourney field and had the
> judges applouded my choice.
>
> Mairi, Atenveldt >>
>
> Hmm.. I find that a little odd considering that linen fibers are much
> stronger than cotton. When I want something to be tough and durable, I make
> it out of linen. I guess that's another case of YMMV.
>
> Yours,
> Pattie Rayl
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 08:38:04 -0700
> From: Merouda the True of Bornover <keltia at serv.net>
> Subject: Re: HNW - Hardanger Embroidery
>
> I think there are basically only two good reasons for not using the period fabric.
>     1.  You couldn't find any
>     2.  You found it but couldn't afford it
>
> > > The question, then, becomes "how does one document the use of a less than
> > > period fabric, when confronted with the prohibitive price of truly period
> > > fabrics, and justify it in the  face of overly picky judges in a
> > > competition?"
>
> - --
> Cynthia Long
> Merouda the True of Bornover
> Barony of Madrone
> Kingdom of An Tir
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 11:50:19 -0400
> From: Mike Newell <72123.411 at compuserve.com>
> Subject: Re: HNW - Re:  Linen evenweave? or cotton?
>
> Dear  Mairi:
>
> < When spun flax is round like any other thread. After weaving, if only
> just washed it will stay round.  But, if calandered, that is rolled between
> hot rollers nowadays or pressed with a hot glass ball in the old days, the
> threads flatten out and fill up more space.>
>
> Thank you for explaining this! I've seen flax processed in various stages
> (mostly at historic 18th century homes/crafts fairs) I didn't  know about
> calandering.
>
> - --Kathryn
> SCA:  Kathryn Goodwyn
> "too many centuries...too little time"
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 19:36:59 -0500
> From: pulliam at acadia.net (Deborah Pulliam)
> Subject: HNW - QE I
>
> << There is a portait of Elizabeth in a dress embroidered with human eyes. >>
>
> Minor point: the Rainbow Portrait (at Hatfield House)  shows QE I in a gown
> with eyes and ears *painted* on the satin lining. They're most definitely
> not embroidered. (actually, it's probably a mantle, not the gown.) Painted
> fabrics were very popular during the 17th century.
>
> Deborah
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 19:37:05 -0500
> From: pulliam at acadia.net (Deborah Pulliam)
> Subject: HNW - early knitting
>
> <<weaving a spare thread in where the heel will be, then =
> going back after the sock is finished and "picking up" this section to =
> knit what appears to be a bag for the heel.  Has anyone done this type =
> of turned heel?>>
>
> I do this kind of heel all the time, in fact, it's my favorite type, as it
> fits and wears well. That being said, it is not appropriate for any early
> (pre-1800) knitting from Northern Europe or North America.
>
> <<The Thomas book also mentioned actually cutting the knitting and =
> turning it under in a hem to open up necklines, etc.  This is a =
> sacrilege! >>]
>
> It may be a sacrilege to you, but it's a common way to make a cardigan. The
> knitted cotton jackets of the 18c (English; made in baby sizes as well as
> adult) are all done this way. Most of the adult ones have a length of
> cotton tabby tape stitched over the raw edges. Most of the baby ones simply
> have the edges turned back and stitched down. Scandinavian cardigans were
> always done this way as well (still are.)
>
> Most early knitting was done in the round, before anyone had even figured
> out how to purl back, and most knitters find it goes much faster to knit
> around and around, instead of knitting forward and purling back and then
> sewing pieces together.
>
> << Does anyone know of a straight needle  knitted garmet from the middle ages?>>
> The earliest known complete pieces of knitting are probably the silk
> cushions in Spain, 13 c. They're knitted in the round, as is the (probably)
> 13c Arabic stocking. Most other pieces from that early are archaeological
> fragments, and so it's impossible to tell how they were made.  The earliest
> pieces in the Museum of London, all of which date to the 15c, are all
> circular knitting.
>
> The earliest flat knitting I can think of are the silk and gilt jackets,
> which are *tentatively* dated 17c (but nothing is known of their
> manufacture). They're fairly crudely knitted, in rectangles, and
> sewn/knitted to fit in the finishing.
>
> Deborah
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 20:43:16 EDT
> From: DettaS at aol.com
> Subject: Re: HNW - early knitting
>
> <<Most early knitting was done in the round, before anyone had even figured
> out how to purl back>>
>
> What kind of needles were used for circular knitting?
>
> Detta
> <A HREF="http://www.dettasspindle.com">Detta's Spindle</A>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 20:19:13 -0500
> From: Heitman <fiondel at fastrans.net>
> Subject: Re: HNW - re:"Saxon" embroidery/costume
>
> >Oh goodness!.. Don't be sorry for the space... :-)  I would love to see that
> >web page too..
> >
> >Sincerely,
> >Trinite
>
> I generally hate these, but.......
>
> Me, too.
>
> (just so you'll know there's enough interest to post it to the whole list.)
>
> Fiondel
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 19:49:21 -0700
> From: Curtis & Mary <ladymari at cybertrails.com>
> Subject: Re: HNW - Hardanger Embroidery
>
> >
> >
> > Hmm.. I find that a little odd considering that linen fibers are much
> > stronger than cotton. When I want something to be tough and durable, I make
> > it out of linen. I guess that's another case of YMMV.
>
> Yes, but if I'd gone to the expense of linen, I'dve used silk for the embroidery.
> Which is what I'll be using for a rapier champions favor soon.
> Mairi
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 19:52:25 -0700
> From: Curtis & Mary <ladymari at cybertrails.com>
> Subject: Re: HNW - Re:  Linen evenweave? or cotton?
>
> > Thank you for explaining this! I've seen flax processed in various stages
> > (mostly at historic 18th century homes/crafts fairs) I didn't  know about
> > calandering.
>
> Your welcome.  I kinda thought this might not be known too much from the
> discussion of some cloth threads being flatter and some being rounder.  Also
> remember that the more linen is washed, ironed and worn the softer it gets.
> Mairi
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 23:23:07 -0400
> From: "debra dunbar" <felinebert at prodigy.net>
> Subject: Re: HNW - early knitting
>
> - ----- Original Message -----
> From: Deborah Pulliam <pulliam at acadia.net>
>
> You wrote:
> >I do this kind of heel all the time, in fact, it's my favorite type, as it
> >fits and wears well. That being said, it is not appropriate for any early
> >(pre-1800) knitting from Northern Europe or North America.
>
> Thank you for all your information!  Do you know of what type of heel I
> should do for a 15th or 16th century stocking?  There are some examples in
> Rutt, but I'm having a hard time following how they actually constructed the
> heel.
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 11 May 1999 23:23:07 -0400
> From: "debra dunbar" <felinebert at prodigy.net>
> Subject: Re: HNW - early knitting
>
> - ----- Original Message -----
> From: Deborah Pulliam <pulliam at acadia.net>
>
> You wrote:
> >I do this kind of heel all the time, in fact, it's my favorite type, as it
> >fits and wears well. That being said, it is not appropriate for any early
> >(pre-1800) knitting from Northern Europe or North America.
>
> Thank you for all your information!  Do you know of what type of heel I
> should do for a 15th or 16th century stocking?  There are some examples in
> Rutt, but I'm having a hard time following how they actually constructed the
> heel.
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of h-needlework V1 #336
> ***************************
>
> ============================================================================
> Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.

============================================================================
Go to http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html to perform mailing list tasks.


More information about the H-needlework mailing list