HNW - Re: blackwork - starting and ending

Frank Thallas hardcorps at vcn.com
Wed Aug 16 13:27:22 PDT 2000


  I'm a "she" - can't figure out how to change the
name on Himself's computer!! <G>
  The biggest thing in blackwork is that none of it's as difficult as it
looks - just take a bit of time in the planning, and practice practice
practice!

 THLady Liadain ni Mhordha, OFO
Grand Champion of Arts and Sciences (blackwork CAN beat the flashy stuff!)
The Outlands

> He said it better then I did! ;-D
> Roslyn H.
> who first fell in love with embroidery when she was around 10-and we
aren't
> going to say how many centuries ago that was! <LOL>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Frank Thallas [mailto:hardcorps at vcn.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, August 16, 2000 2:51 PM
> To: H-Needlework at ansteorra.org
> Subject: Re: HNW - Re: blackwork - starting and ending
>
>
>   Greetings, and welcome!
>     First of all, blackwork isn't necessarily seen from both sides - it
> depends on the use you're putting it to.  A ruffle
> like Jane Seymour's sleeves, a ruff, yep.  A cuff or collar, nope.  Of
> course you still want your back as tidy as possible,  since lumps and long
> threads are liable to show through fine fabric.....
>     On to the question - assuming double-running stitch?
> This is my method; I'm sure someone else has a different one just as good.
>     First, work with the longest thread you can, without it becoming
frayed.
> Make a waste knot, and sink the needle 2-3 inches from where you will
begin
> stitching.
> Leave this knot on the surface while you work the rest of the thread.
>     At the end of the thread, weave the end as neatly as possible under
the
> stitches on the back side of the work -
> this will make that bit look a little thicker, but shouldn't really be
> noticeable.
>     Now go back to the beginning, clip off your waste knot, and weave this
> end under the beginning stitches at
> the back.....
>     The big trick is to not have too many threads beginning/ending at the
> same place, so that the ends vanish into the pattern, which takes a little
> planning of
> thread journeys.
>     Good luck, and welcome to the wonderful obsession of
> blackwork!
>
> Liadain
>
> > Hello all - I am a newbie here, found out about you from H-Cost.
> >
> > My question is about blackwork embroidery - how do you start and end the
> > threads? Nothing that I have read talks about this issue. If I were
doing
> > "regular" embroidery I would catch the tail of the thread under stitches
> in
> > the back, but since you're supposed to see both sides the same, I wasn't
> sure
> > how to start and end the threads.
> >
> > Thanks for your help!
> >
> > **********************
> > Rebecca Schmitt
> > aka Mistress Agnes Cabot, wife of Master Peter Cabot, cod merchant of
> Bristol
> >
> > So many books, so little time
> >
> > schmitt100 at aol.com
> > **********************
> >
>
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