No subject


Sun May 28 09:43:46 PDT 2006


"Crochet work proper is, in its present improved form, almost a modern
invention. It has only been introduced to any extent into this country
within  the last twenty years, but now it is very general, and our
old-fashioned knitting work is completely thrown into the background by the
crochet needle."

This quote appeared in an article called "Needlework and Its History" in
OLD -TIME CROCHET magazine, Spring 2002. Just FYI

--Kathryn
SCA: Kathryn Goodwyn
"too many centuries...too little time"

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Message: 2
Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2002 15:30:24 -0700
From: Carolyn Kayta Barrows <kayta at frys.com>
Subject: Re: [HNW] historicity of crochet
To: h-needlework at ansteorra.org
Reply-To: h-needlework at ansteorra.org


>We've had several long discussions on when crochet was first done. Here is
>some "fuel for the fire" on it being a 19th century phenomena.

The only quibble I have with that is that 'phenomena' is a plural, and
'phenomenon' is the singular.  Other than that, I agree with your
assessment, and the 1854 one, completely.

>  Please note
>that the date is 1854.
>
> >From "Ladies Complete Guide To Crochet & Fancy Knitting" (Garrett & Co.,
>Publishers, 18 Ann Street, New York, 1854):
>
>"Crochet work proper is, in its present improved form, almost a modern
>invention. It has only been introduced to any extent into this country
>within  the last twenty years, but now it is very general, and our
>old-fashioned knitting work is completely thrown into the background by the
>crochet needle."
>
>This quote appeared in an article called "Needlework and Its History" in
>OLD -TIME CROCHET magazine, Spring 2002. Just FYI
>
>--Kathryn
>SCA: Kathryn Goodwyn
>"too many centuries...too little time"
>_______________________________________________
>H-needlework mailing list
>H-needlework at ansteorra.org
>http://www.ansteorra.org/mailman/listinfo/h-needlework


Kayta

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Message: 3
Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2002 00:27:08 -0500
From: Karen Heim <axejudge at accessus.net>
To: h-needlework at ansteorra.org
Subject: [HNW] Re: H-needlework digest, Vol 1 #503 - 15 msgs
Reply-To: h-needlework at ansteorra.org

--
[ Picked text/plain from multipart/alternative ]


h-needlework-request at ansteorra.org wrote:

>
>Message: 7
>Date: Wed, 09 Oct 2002 18:23:56 -0400
>From: <mmriedel at mindspring.com>
>To: h-needlework at ansteorra.org
>Subject: RE: [HNW] wearing knit shawls
>Reply-To: h-needlework at ansteorra.org
>
>Deborah said:
>
>>It's helpful to learn both, and be comfortable
>>working with either
>>hand, because it *really* speeds up two-color
>>knitting in particular
>>(also prevents tangles.)
>>
>
>I knit continental and was taught a super easy way to do two color knitting
>also in continental.  It goes very smoothly.  (I can't knit the other way.)
>
>>While continental knitters claim their way  is
>>the fastest way to
>>work, most of the super-fast Shetland knitters
>>throw the yarn with
>>the right hand. The trick to speed is
>>supporting the right (working)
>>needle with a whisk or belt.
>>
>
>You can also do something similar with continental.  When I was very young
and
>first learned I always held the left needle under my left arm, or against
the
>left side of my midriff held in place by my left arm, and knitted "off" the
>left needle.  It was years before I could hold both needles out in front of
>myself without supporting the left needle against my side.  I still can't
do
>it well.  However, once I changed to circular needles everything went
great.
>I can hold then out independently from my body and of course still do
>continental.  Everyone who sees me knit is amazed at the speed and now the
>lady in the local shop is trying to learn how to knit that way also.
>
>I would also add that I've heard that NOT throwing the yarn is better for
your
>hands in the long term and I know some who deliberately learned continental
>because they were having so much trouble with their right hand after years
of
>English/American style knitting.
>
>MaryR
>Toluca Lake, CA
>

I find that if I am knitting with straight needles. I need to stick the
left needle so that I can hold it with my legs (no smart comments,
please).  I don't know why I started doing that, although I did start
knitting at a young age, and I didn't have much wrist strength (as
evidenced by the fact that at around the same time I was learning to
knit, I dropped a pot of boiling water on my foot while trying to take
it to the sink to drain my macaroni for mac 'n' cheese).

I saw the listing of knitting styles around the world.  My style matches
up with what they showed as German.  Now, that may be my ethnic
heritage, but I only know that's just how my mom did it, so that's how I
did it.

Karen
--


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Message: 4
Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2002 09:10:08 -0400
From: Mike Newell <72123.411 at compuserve.com>
To: h-needlework <h-needlework at ansteorra.org>
Subject: [HNW] congrats to Kim!
Reply-To: h-needlework at ansteorra.org

Dear List:

I just received my copy of the new booo "A Passion for Knitting."  Kim
Salazar is mentioned in several places in their chapters on online
resources.

"A Passion for Knitting", Nancy J. Thomas & Iana Rabnowitz, A Fireside
Book,Simon & Schuster, NY 2002 ISBN 0-684-87069-X  list price $18.895 but
$14.95 until October 14th via the Lion  Brand Yarn website.

Good job, Kim!

--Kathryn
SCA: Kathryn Goodwyn
"too many centuries...too little time"


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