[HNW] crochetted tablecloth

Lynn Carpenter alwen at i2k.com
Tue Nov 4 18:39:21 PST 2008


Lavolta Press <fran at lavoltapress.com> wrote:

>One I translated from an 1827 French source for amateur needleworkers.
>It is part of a method of making a hat that supposedly imitates a hat of
>Leghorn straw, which was expensive. The reader is instructed to make a
>flat braid by "a kind of knitting, or rather a chain-stitch."  That's
>exactly what it is from the instructions, a basic crochet chain stitch.
>The tool is described as an "iron instrument two or three inches long,
>terminating in a curved point, and fitted into a wooden handle." The
>reader is told to make enough of this braid to form the hat--no quantity
>is given but it would be a lot, because it's supposed to be fine. The
>author mentions that the braid could also be bought ready-made. Then,
>the reader is instructed to use the braid like straw braid, winding it
>around to form the hat, and sewing the edges of the braid together with
>a sewing needle. In other words, the concept of forming the hat entirely
>by crocheting is not there. After the hat was sewn together, a
>stiffening mixture had to be applied to make the hat support itself, but
>that's another issue.

This sounds close to the Romanian point lace a friend of mine has been 
learning.
http://tatt3r-lace.blogspot.com/2008/11/romanian-point-lace-snowflake.html

She is more of a knitter than crocheter, and said learning to make the 
braids has been a real learning curve.  After making all the braid, 
couching it down, and attaching it together with needle lace, or making the 
braid and sewing it together into a hat, it doesn't seem too long a leap to 
crocheting the braid to itself as you work it.

(Pure speculation only, and I am certainly the last one to try to push the 
date of a craft back without any kind of evidence.)

Lynn Carpenter in SW Michigan, USA
http://lost-arts.blogspot.com/
Ravelry ID: alwen



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